Communication and roles among family

Describe several attributes of dysfunctional family communication patterns and identify some specific strategies you can use for positively influencing or changing family communication patterns.

Explain why changing role functions within the family can create stress and/or conflict and how the family nurse can respond. Please use examples from your practice setting to support your answer.

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... received without distortions.
* Recognize that all messages should be received with a positive attitude (http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Ob-Or/Open-and-Closed-Systems.html).

2. Explain why changing role functions within the family can create stress and/or conflict and how the family nurse can respond. Please use examples from your practice setting to support your answer.

A role is an assumed or spoken agreement between two or more people about who is responsible to fill a set of specific needs among them. For example, family adults are responsible for providing food, shelter, safety, guidance, and nurturance; and kids are responsible for learning how to leave home, and cooperating with their adults as they do (http://sfhelp.org/pop2/roles-rules.htm). However, in a dysfunctional family some rigid roles emerge. Satir and Bulbrook Models of Family Dynamics and Communication propose roles of families (blamer, etc.), whole others propose other family roles.

In a dysfunctional family, roles become rigid, such as the Hero, Scapegoat, Lost Child, and Mascot. These roles are difficult to change because one change disrupts the whole family system. Family Systems theory considers looking at the family system as a mobile and a change in the role of one member upsets the whole mobile and causes much stress as they family members scramble for equilibrium again. This has been applied to alcohol families, families where there is one or more family members suffering from a disorder, such as alcoholism, codependence, chronic illness or mental illness.

The Hero provides the self-esteem for the family being the over-achiever, often being the first child; the scapegoat is the child that the family feels ashamed of - and the most emotionally honest child in the family. He/she acts out the tension and anger the family ignores--providing distraction from the real issues in the family. The Lost Child has the role of providing the need for privacy; and the mascot provides the fun for the family. These roles are very destructive for family members, as parts of their self are denied to the exclusion of playing these roles. Each ...