Race-Based Interaction Patterns

Overall impact of race-based interaction patterns in our society.

- Massey makes the point that spatial mobility is a barrier to social mobility—what is your interpretation of this concept?
- In greater detail, consider how immigration settlement and spatial assimilation contribute to these patterns.
- Do patterns of segregation differ for different minority groups?
- With this in mind, do you think that forced integration, such as busing students to increase diversity in public schools, is a viable solution?
- What should be done, if anything to decrease this spatial barrier of neighborhood in a way that is beneficial to society overall?

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The above example actually happens frequently. Why this happens is not always clear as it reveals questions of who is permitted to occupy certain classes in certain nations. Is it based on race? Or tribe? Or affiliation? Or income? Or sex? Or ethnicity? Or spoken language?

There is a relationship that exists between distance and space. You can consider whether there is an assimilation of this distance and space or as some scholars explain a hybridization of spatial and social categories.

In greater detail, consider how immigration settlement and spatial assimilation contribute to these patterns.

People move based on moving away from how they are presently living to a perceived better lifestyle. What we observe is that immigrants who migrate to the same place (usually metropolitan areas), will usually settle in an area with others like themselves.

The reasons for this can vary because there are people who do not want to interact with anyone from their home country in the new country. Some people want to be able to hold on to some connection to their home country through familiar association as in living in close proximity to ...